The Bahrain World Trade Center

Bahrain World Trade CenterThe Bahrain World Trade Center building is a fairly new structure that now dominates the skyline in this relatively small but rich Middle East island country. Located in the capital city of Manama, the said building is a 50 story twin tower complex standing 240 meters high. The building was designed by Shaun Killa, an architect from South Africa.

Design Features

The Bahrain World Trade Center building is notable in that it is the first ever building in the world to integrate the use of wind turbines as part of its design. The identical twin towers were design to look like two identical sails, in reference to the maritime environment of the small Middle Eastern island state.

The twin towers provide a striking silhouette that dominates the Manama skyline, a seemingly large giant among the other structures found on the city. But this is not the feature that makes the building so interesting.

The Three Giant Turbines

The building is notable for its unique giant wind turbines that is integrated into the design of the structure. Each turbine is 29 meters in diameter and is held up in place by 30 meter bridges that span in between the two towers.

The giant wind turbines were designed to generate electricity from the wind that the building can use. The giant turbines face north, the direction where the winds come into Bahrain from the Persian Gulf.

Clean Electricity Generation

The sail-shaped design of the twin towers also help funnel the wind to provide maximum flow to the giant turbines. This funneling effect helps significantly increase the potential of the giant turbines to generate electricity.

The three giant turbines are expected to generate from 11 to 15 percent of the twin towers’ total power consumption, which is estimated at 1.1 to 1.3 GWh annually . This is enough energy to provide lighting for about 300 homes in a year.

The three turbines were used for the first time on April 8, 2008 from where they are expected to be operating 50 percent of the time in one day.

 
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