Williams Tower

Williams TowerThe Williams Tower is an imposing skyscraper located in Houston, Texas. It is one of Houston’s tallest and one of its most recognizable skyscrapers. The Williams Tower is actually the fourth tallest in Texas and the 22nd tallest in the United States. The building bears the name of its current major tenant.

Williams Tower History

Williams Tower was constructed sometime in 1983. The building was originally developed by Hines Interests LC, a real estate firm in Houston. It was designed by architects Philip Johnson and John Burgee together with Morris-Aubry Architects. The skyscraper was originally known as the Transco Tower after is first major tenant, Transco Energy Corporation. It was known by its previous name until 1999. Hines, the building owner, agreed to have the name of the skyscraper changed four years after Transco Energy was bought by the Williams Energy Company in 1995.

Williams Tower Features

The Williams Tower stands 277 meters or 909 feet tall. It contains 64 stories all in all. The building is considered unique in that it was built to function as two separate towers being stacked one on top of each other- the first tower comprising the first forty floors while the other tower comprising the forty first up to the sixty-fourth floor. The building has separate banks of elevators and lobbies that service each of the two building sections. Most of the first forty floors from the bottom are being occupied by Williams. The remaining floors atop the building are being occupied by a variety of other tenants.

Other Notable Features

The 51st floor of the Williams Tower acts as a sky lobby and its observation deck. Unfortunately, it is no longer open to the public due to security reasons. At night, a bright, 7,000 watt beacon lights up on top of the building and sweeps across the sky which can be seen for up to 40 miles on a clear night. The building is also connected to an adjacent 10 level parking garage building by way of a sky bridge. Adjacent to the Williams Tower is a grass field which contains the Williams Waterwall, a known Houston landmark.

 
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